Carhartt Force Girls’ Realtree Xtra Quarter Zip

$19.99

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Carhartt Force Girls’ Realtree Xtra Quarter Zip

Lightweight, long sleeve t-shirt that wicks away sweat.

 

  • Lightweight, 4-ounce, 100% polyester
  • Kids are active. FastDry technology wicks away sweat
  • Fights odors: traps and releases them in the wash
  • Stain Breaker allows stains to wash out easily
  • Thumb holes in sleeve rib

 

 

About Carhartt

The year 1889 was a time of steel, smoke, and locomotives.

Starting with only 2 sewing machines and 5 employees, Hamilton Carhartt established Hamilton Carhartt & Company. At first, he failed. But after asking railroad workers what exactly they needed, he succeeded. Under the motto “Honest value for an honest dollar,” the Carhartt union-made bib overall was created, and with it an ideal garment for workers.

By 1910 Carhartt had grown to include mills in South Carolina and Georgia, as well as sewing facilities in Atlanta, Detroit, Dallas, San Francisco, Walkerville, Toronto, Vancouver, and Liverpool. A Paris facility and a New York office and warehouse followed later.

The company offered the government the use of seven of their facilities to create uniforms for the U.S. military in World War I (and later denim for the U.S. Navy and workwear for women entering the workforce during World War II).

In 1929 the stock market collapsed, an event as brutal to this company as it was to the rest of the country. The company came close to shutting its doors for good. Keeping the business alive was a testament to the tenacity, passion and ingenuity of Hamilton and his sons. Together, they created the B01 Men’s Firm Duck Double-Front Dungaree in 1932.

At Hamilton’s death in 1937, his son Wylie took over. Wylie had played a crucial role in the “Back to the Land” program, which led to the opening of new operations in Kentucky.  Four sewing and cutting facilities are still operating in Kentucky and Tennessee to this day. Wylie was also instrumental in creating the Super Dux and Super Fab hunting lines.

Wylie’s daughter Gretchen married Robert Valade who assumed leadership in 1959. In 1972, Robert Valade, VP of Sales Gus Feles, and EVP of Manufacturing Don Rasinen formed a nucleus that changed the face of the company forever. They bought their first “modern” production facility and were able to do a significant private label business for several stores including Sears, J.C. Penney and Montgomery Ward. This allowed them the necessary revenue to continue to expand its production. In 1976, the hard-finish duck Active Jac was introduced in a “Hoodie” form; the style remains the top-selling jacket for the company today. In the 70’s, the Alaska Pipeline helped grow the brand and Carhartt showed the world it could survive and thrive in the most rugged corners of the world.

The Carhartt brand became an anti-fashion icon in the 70’s and 80’s with the grunge and punk and later with the Hip Hop world and remains popular with rappers to this day. This led to the WIP line, making Carhartt fashionable in Europe and Asia.

In 1996, Mark Valade became the President of Carhartt. Mark heralded the company into the global era with the formation of European operations and Internet technologies. He launched Carhartt-owned retail stores, a full women’s line, and our extremely successful Flame-Resistant line of garments.

With entrepreneurial vision and determination, Hamilton Carhartt and the next three generations of Carhartts have established a brand that has stood the test of time.

The company employs more than 2,100 U.S. associates in Detroit, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Over the past 15 years, more than 80 million Carhartt garments and accessories were made in the USA and this year alone, over 6 million pieces of Carhartt work wear and accessories will be produced here.

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